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Exterior Doors

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The fast rise of this durable exterior door material underscores its remarkable characteristics. Can anything top a quality fiberglass door? It’s a bold question to ask because of the material’s brief time in the marketplace. The first fiberglass exterior door was introduced less than 40 years ago. Wood and steel, the material’s leading competitors, have been around much longer. Why fiberglass? It starts with the material itself – a thermoplastic resin reinforced with glass fiber. Cheaper and more flexible than carbon fiber, fiberglass is stronger than many metals by weight, is non-conductive, and can be molded into almost any shape, including the skin of an exterior door.

Critical considerations for choosing windows and doors that meet performance and style requirements The goal of every remodel is to maximize the home’s long-term value while increasing comfort for the homeowner. Today let’s cover how to accomplish that by choosing the right windows and doors. Replacing the windows, for example, can improve energy efficiency with a tighter home envelope. And modern doors are more functional and secure than their older counterparts. Replacing these elements with updated materials and design helps increase curb appeal and the overall home value. How do you choose the right windows and doors for your remodeling project? Here are a few elements to keep in mind:

Make a memorable statement with the door you choose for your home Brought to you by JELD-WEN Farmhouse style has come a long way since its start with Old MacDonald. Today, you’re just as likely to find it expressed in an urban and suburban home as in the countryside. Over the years, the style has definitely evolved. New versions have been dreamt up, creating a spectrum spanning traditional farmhouse to more modern interpretations. Despite the variety, there are a number of features that farmhouse-inspired designs do share in common. Start with the front door — it’s how you set the tone for your home’s design. There are several options that set farmhouses apart. Many people choose to incorporate an old favorite: the Dutch door. The style has been an American staple since the 17th century. With its two independent sections, the Dutch door won fans as much for its novel…

Check out this comparison of the most popular exterior door materials When choosing the right exterior door, you’ll want to compare each material. The three most popular exterior door materials are wood, fiberglass and steel. Each has its own advantages. In this post, we’ll take a look at each material and provide relevant information so you can make an informed decision. Wood Wood is the most traditional and one of the oldest materials used for doors, dating back to ancient times. The earliest records of wooden doors are represented in the paintings of the Egyptian tombs. Fast forward a few thousand years, and wood is still an excellent choice for doors. Doors can be crafted from hardwoods and softwoods. The most widely used are Cherry, Oak, Walnut, Mahogany, Knotty Alder, Douglas Fir and Pine. Why you’ll love wood exterior doors: Beauty and warmth immediately invites guests into your homeFrom modern…

Fire-rated doors help reduce the spread of fire and smoke in a home or building. Both commercial and residential structures can use fire-rated doors. Fire door materials and parts Fire doors can consist of a combination of materials: gypsum, steel, timber, Vermiculite, aluminum and glass. Both the slab and the door frame must meet requirements to earn a fire-rating. The door frame parts include seals, hardware and the structure. On an even more granular level here is a breakdown of elements: Seals An intumescent strip, which expands when exposed to heatGaskets to prevent the passage of smokeNeoprene weatherstripping Door hardware Automatic closing devices or objectsBall-bearing hingesGas sealsPositive latching mechanismsSmoke seals Standards for fire-rated doors If a window is present,it must have a rating as well. Fire-rated glass may contain wire mesh glass, liquid sodium silicate, ceramic glass or borosilicate glass. Wired glass typically withstands the fire. The sodium silicate liquid…

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